Walkability

Walkability

 

Help make your community more walkable by filling out COTA’s Walkability Audit.

This walkability audit prepares people to assess areas of walkability in their community. It provides tips on what to consider when assessing walkability, checklists to use, and what steps to take next.

A shorter Walkability Postcard can be a great starting point and can be sent directly to your local council. Use the order form below or contact COTA Tasmania on 6231 3265 or admin@cotatas.org.au and we’ll send you some.

What is walkability?

Walkability is more than being able to walk. It’s about being able to access your community. It means that everyone, regardless of their physical ability or life stage, is able to move in their own community, and between other communities. Walkability is strongly impacted by the built environment and promotes physical activity and has other health benefits.

Some aspects of walkability are that streets, roads and footpaths are:

  • Safe: from cars, falling or tripping, rubbish, and crime.
  • Attractive: with plants, art, fountains and other features that are well maintained.
  • Comfortable: footpaths are easy to walk on and regular seating, shade and water fountains provide rest stops.
  • Connected: footpaths continually connect different parts of the community with appropriate transitions from footpath to road at crossings, and there are clear signs for nearby facilities.

What is the Walkability Audit?

This walkability audit prepares people to assess areas of walkability in their community. It provides tips on what to consider when assessing walkability, checklists to use, and what steps to take next.

The audit includes:

  • Getting Started
  • Crossing Streets and Intersections
  • Footpaths
  • Driver Behaviour
  • Safety
  • Comfort and Appeal
  • Route Rating, Observations and Suggestions
  • Possible Solutions
  • Taking Action

Why is it important?

When streets, roads, footpaths and neighbourhoods feel safe, attractive, comfortable and are connected, people are much more likely to walk or ride in them rather than travelling by vehicle. This increase people’s physical activity and health, but also their interactions with community members and nature, both of which are good for mental health. It also encourages people to shop locally rather than travelling to other areas, and people are less likely to fall and be injured when walking.